American Pale Ale - NRB's All Amarillo APA

Post #1 made 10 years ago
[center]AMERICAN PALE ALE - NRB'S All Amarillo APA
(Remember to use The Converter to display this recipe in metric or US.)[/center]

Thanks to NRB for the original recipe he posted here.

OVERVIEW

Style: American Pale Ale
Name: NRB's All Amarillo American Pale Ale
Yeast: US-56 (US-05)
Fermentation Temperature: 18 C
Original Gravity: 1.058
Total IBU's: 30.8
Colour (EBC): 24.6
Efficiency at End of Boil: 81%
Mash Length (mins): 90
Boil Length (mins): 90
Your Vessel Type (Pot/Keggle/Urn): Pot
Source/Credits: Original recipe can be found here
Notes/Instructions/Comments: A very popular and robust recipe. Amounts can be varied greatly whilst still getting a great beer. For example, for a more bitter beer but still full of flavour, reverse the hop schedule below.

Volumes etc.

Your Vessel Volume (L or gal): 70 L
Your Vessel Diameter (cm or in): 45 cm
Water Required (L or gal): 41 L
Mash Temperature (C or F): 65 C
Volume at End of Boil (L or gal): 26.8 L
Volume into Fermenter (L or gal): 23 L
Brew Length (L or gal): 21.3 L
Total Grain Bill (g or oz): 6260 g

Grains - Colours - Percentages and/or Weight (g or oz)

Grain 1: Pale Ale Malt (Any type) - 3.6 EBC - 76.9% or 4,814 g
Grain 2: Munich 1 - 17.6 EBC - 15.4% or 964 g
Grain 3: CaraAmber - 94.2 EBC - 7.8% or 488 g

Hops - AA% - IBUs - Weight (g or oz) at Minutes

Hop 1: US Amarillo - 8.9AA% - 15.0 IBUs - 21.0 g at 60 min
Hop 2: US Amarillo - 8.9AA% - 11.6 IBUs - 26.8 g at 20 min
Hop 3: US Amarillo - 8.9AA% - 4.3 IBUs - 30.3 g at 5 min

Adjuncts/Minerals/Finings etc

Adjunct:
Mineral:
Finings: 1/2 tablet of Whirfloc at 5 min.

Fermentation

Safale US-05 for 10 days at 18 C
The Calculator NRB APA.xls
[ADMIN NOTE:The above was updated to the latest version of The Calculator on 12th March 2011 to fix a terminology error. Previous number of downloads = 452. Hop bill error corrected on 16 June 2012.]
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Last edited by BIABrewer on 15 Feb 2010, 18:38, edited 41 times in total.

Post #2 made 8 years ago
This topic is now open so feel free to post to it.

[center]MODNOTE[/center]

I have just corrected the hop bill in post number 1 to match the original recipe. I have also added the comment, "A very popular and robust recipe. Amounts can be varied greatly whilst still getting a great beer. For example, for a more bitter beer but still full of flavour, reverse the hop schedule below."

Prior to this post, the hop schedule was the more bitter version. The recipe brews well either way.
Last edited by Nuff on 16 Jun 2012, 14:27, edited 41 times in total.

Post #3 made 8 years ago
I can see how BIABrewer got the hop schedule mixed up as I did the same. The original recipe has the hop bill listed in reverse order and I have brewed this recipe in the correct order and the reverse order many times. Both versions are great :thumbs:.

Currently, I am brewing it, 'in the middle'. In other words, I am using the weight of the Hop 2 addition for the Hop 1 and Hop 3 additions as well.

You can also ferment this one as low as 15C or as high as 22C and still stay on track. I can't remember ever brewing a bad version of this recipe no matter how much abuse I have given it.

It's the most popular recipe I have brewed (pretty much all palates love it) but I have never received an award for it. (Some other recipes I brew do get awards but I don't think are as good as this one.)

:peace: to NRB for a simple but extremely robust, great-tasting recipe,
PP
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Post #5 made 8 years ago
Yep, that's right lukas. The allowances for trub are on the high side in The Calculator so reducing those will reduce the grain bill or increase what you actually get. It's also a 1.058 recipe although I'll usually brew it at more like 1.050 which again takes the grain bill down.

;)
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Post #7 made 8 years ago
I always keep the grain percentages the same in a recipe so as the balance of flavours remains the same ;).
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Post #8 made 8 years ago
PistolPatch wrote:I always keep the grain percentages the same in a recipe so as the balance of flavours remains the same ;).
That's what I do, keep it all the same.

I remember when I first started AG, the advice then was to only reduce the base malts to lower the gravity and keep the spec grains the same. It didn't sound right then :scratch:
Last edited by hashie on 27 Jun 2012, 17:13, edited 41 times in total.
"It's beer Jim, but not as we know it."

Post #9 made 7 years ago
Thoughts, I was thinking about CaraRed as I have some rather than CaraAmber in the recipe, is there really much difference?
Also I have some harvested White Labs WLP001 California Ale Yeast rather than US-05, this should be good for this style right?

Post #10 made 7 years ago
The red should be a fine substitute, probably make it look like an Irish Red Ale....perfect for St. Patty's day! US-05 is the dry equivilant of the WLP001 (they are the same strain of yeast).

---Todd
WWBBD?
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Post #12 made 7 years ago
Hey Guys,

Gonna be brewing this hopefully in the next few days. (Will adjust the grain bill slightly as I need to get it in a 19l KEG). Any reports on the taste of this?

Comments / Suggestions ?

Post #13 made 7 years ago
It's a great recipe mapeterpan,

You can get it in BIABacus Pre-Release form here atm. Just type your kettle dimensions into Section B and 19 L into the VIF field in Section B and the recipe will be scaled and ready to go for you.

:luck:
Last edited by PistolPatch on 09 May 2013, 20:52, edited 40 times in total.
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Post #15 made 7 years ago
:thumbs: BIABacus :thumbs:

Seems all the calcs. were almost spot on! Thought I would start with a little less water seeing as BIABacus caters for a lot of trub wastage and I did not want to undershoot this one.

My Adjusted File
BIABacus PR1.3 - American Pale Ale - NRB%27s Amarillo APA - MAPeterpan Batch 1.xlsx
MY equipment:
50l Electric Urn (with bypassed cutout switch for full boil).
Kettle Diameter 36.5cm and Height 50cm.

Estimated Total Water Needed: 34.6l
Actual: 33l

Estimated Volume into Kettle: 32l
Actual 30l

Estimated End Of Boil Vol: 25.48
Actual: 23.5

Estimated Gravity into Kettle: 1045
Actual: 1047

Estimated End of Boil Gravity: 1058
Actual: 1062



Now BIABacus gives Actual Efficiencies:
EIK: 77.7
EOBE: 78.2
EIF: 74.6

Does this seems right? If it is, I think it went pretty well.

Just out of interest, I meassured the weight of the grain bag after I drained and squezed it and it meassured at 8.8KG's. Total grain bill was 7.5KG so there was +- 1.3KG/1.3L lost due to grain absorption if my calculations are + correct. :interesting:

:think:
Not sure about the "Mash Volume" in Section L. Is that the amount of water used to start mash with or the vol in kettle before mash with grains included ?
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Last edited by mapeterpan on 11 May 2013, 18:04, edited 40 times in total.

Post #16 made 7 years ago
Nice job mapeter :salute:,

It's always great when someone manages to take a few sets of volume and gravity measurements on their brew. It really accelerates things so good on you :champ:.

On your next brew, don't worry about typing in zeroes in Sections N and W as they are not needed. Everything else is perfect ;).

Your KFL in Section L of 1.0 litre is very low. It's not impossible but I want to question it. If you are using some sort of advanced trub management technique then you can put a 'Y' beside Hopsock or Whirlpool in Section G and this will reduce the BIABacus KFL auto-estimate a bit. Anyway, the reason I am asking about this is that sometimes, a low amount of trub in the kettle means a lot of trub in the fermentor.

On the grain absorption thing, it is a tricky/confusing area. Basically, it does not work on weights, it works only on volumes. In other words, the kg of weight does not equal a litre in volume in this area. There is some info on this written here somewhere. A search on the word absorption might find something but the long and short of it all is, "Don't weigh the spent grain. Instead measure the volume before and after pulling (and draining/squeezing the bag."

Which brings us to...

Mash Volume. Mash Volume is the volume in your kettle after you have added the grains. You can measure it any time from shortly after 'raining in the grain' (striking) right through to just before you pull the bag.

As to your efficiencies...

EIK and EOBE are matching very nicely and are within a bee's of the estimate. These are the important efficiency figures. There are two sides to being so close to the estimates...

The Good Side: Nothing seems out of order on this brew :peace:.

The Bad Side 1: Getting so close to the estimates would be more the exception than the rule. In fact, if everything is lined up, (pH etc), you should be able to do better than the BIABacus auto-estimates of EIK and EOBE.

The Bad Side 2: Matching the BIABcus estimates closely on an early brew can lead to the belief that all future brews will match closely. They won't and shouldn't for many reasons the main one being that we homebrewers are measuring small quantities with relatively primitive instruments.

'Efficiency into Fermentor (EIF)', on it's own, tells us nothing. Most software only shows one efficiency figure in their report and EIF is the one (but it is given various names). The EIF in the BIABacus can tell us something as it is always seen right next to EOBE.

We've seen how your EIK and EOBE closely matched the estimates. Why did your EIF exceed the estimates? The answer is because you had very little 'Kettle to Fermentor Loss (KFL)'.

If the BIABacus had just focused (and 'reported') EIF, we would not know if you were a great masher/lauterer or whether you just threw a heap of cloudy trub into your fermentor. Mashing/lautering and kettle to fermentor trub management are two important, entirely separate areas. Nearly all, (probably all) software muddies these two areas.

Hope the above makes some sense mapeter. Once again, nice job :party:,
PP
Last edited by PistolPatch on 11 May 2013, 19:41, edited 40 times in total.
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Post #17 made 7 years ago
PistolPatch wrote:Nice job mapeter :salute:,

On your next brew, don't worry about typing in zeroes in Sections N and W as they are not needed. Everything else is perfect ;).
Noted.
PistolPatch wrote: Your KFL in Section L of 1.0 litre is very low. It's not impossible but I want to question it. If you are using some sort of advanced trub management technique then you can put a 'Y' beside Hopsock or Whirlpool in Section G and this will reduce the BIABacus KFL auto-estimate a bit. Anyway, the reason I am asking about this is that sometimes, a low amount of trub in the kettle means a lot of trub in the fermentor.
Ok. That makes sense. No adv trub management were used, and mostly I do end of with a lot of trub in fermenter so I will revise this value to accomodate this.
PistolPatch wrote: On the grain absorption thing, it is a tricky/confusing area. Basically, it does not work on weights, it works only on volumes. In other words, the kg of weight does not equal a litre in volume in this area. There is some info on this written here somewhere. A search on the word absorption might find something but the long and short of it all is, "Don't weigh the spent grain. Instead measure the volume before and after pulling (and draining/squeezing the bag."

Which brings us to...

Mash Volume. Mash Volume is the volume in your kettle after you have added the grains. You can measure it any time from shortly after 'raining in the grain' (striking) right through to just before you pull the bag.
Understood, thank you.



On a side note, she is fermenting away at around 19 deg going on 3rd day now with a bubble per second and sure smells nice!!
Last edited by mapeterpan on 13 May 2013, 14:10, edited 40 times in total.
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