Post #26 made 2 years ago
Okay, I reviewed thylacine's article posting last night. In it, recommendation seemed to be, if first step of a step mash is supposed to be 145 deg F for example, you should start there as your first temperature step, that the first step is hugely important. After that it's okay to go up in temp or whatever... Idea of ramping up to a much higher temperature and then leaving the mash (insulated container...or for BIABers wrapped and insulated pot) overnight and come back next morning to mash out and complete brew...was the suggestion (as a time saver), but don't miss the first temperature step! (That you somehow "lock in" the mash by that first temperature step).

Reviewed Nik's link above too. Last night and this morning... Looks like GuingesRock (someone who no longer posts here) had some great questions... Seems to have been some great questions raised. But I do not see where Any Actual Conclusions were reached. No testing, no practical experiments, etc. That's actually frustrating... :scratch: We're any tests done?

Joshua - were a bunch of your posts somehow deleted...??? Both in that post and another one linked to from it there were people saying responding to your posts - only there were no Joshua posts. So leaves me wondering if a critical thought or idea may have been lost... (???) Seems too bad... Like a bunch of thoughts - perhaps good thoughts - may have been lost to history. :scratch:

Does anyone have any actual testing on going to a higher temp and then letting it settle back, is this truly an okay thing to do? This takes my Original Post in a different direction, for sure, but these thoughts seem somehow related. In one of those posts there was comments about an escalator mash but no explanation on what that actually is. Pat mentioned he was initially a proponent and wrote about it but it didn't perform as well with multiple subsequent tests and he was no longer in favor. Is this an escalator mash (this we are talking about - going to higher temp and letting it drop...? I'm a little bit confused here. :scratch: What is the Conclusion??? :?: Can anything be clarified here so that knowledge is actually gained? :?: :?: :?:
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Post #27 made 2 years ago
Scott, I have Stepped, Ramped, Single Infusion, and Reversed Mashed.

The Only noticeable difference has been the Reverse Mash (start High, and let it Cool).

The Original question was "How Much Precision Do You Use w/ Managing Mash Temperature?"

My answer is, to Make "Beer", NONE.

To make a "Recipe" Beer, it is Very Important.

To Duplicate a "Recipe", batch to batch, which is Very Difficult, it is Very Important.

If the "Recipe" says Mash at 145F/62C for an Hour, and then Mash at 157F/60C for 30 minutes, you Should, to make that "Style" Beer.

I only make "Beer".

JMHO.
Honest Officer, I swear to Drunk, I am Not God.
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From United States of America

Post #28 made 2 years ago
Hey Josh,

I appreciate your thoughts... When I read your last post from yesterday where you finish with "I only make beer". My mind says "but I want to make GOOD BEER"! ;) I do not want to degrade beer quality, and not saying this would do that. It's basically what happened with my brew session last weekend, and "we'll see" how it turns out...

Didn't you, with your initial comments on this, say it does not matter the mash order you put it in as long as the proper Time in each Alpha and Beta Amalyse was met. So you could go higher first and let it drop without adjusting. That's an interesting thought, and could be a great time saver, particularly if you (or others) have proven it with testing (maybe some side-by-sides, etc.). :think:
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Post #29 made 2 years ago
Scott, Any Beer that is Drinkable is a Great Beer! It is pretty easy to take Bad Beer and Make "Malt" vinegar with Hop Flavoring.

The process of mashing-in near 70C and letting it Drop to 60C, Makes a very Different Style of Beer, That may not agree with everyone's Palate.

The Beer is repeatable, and kind of easy to make. Side to side testing versus Standard mashing will show the difference very Quickly.
Honest Officer, I swear to Drunk, I am Not God.
    • SVA Brewer With Over 100 Brews From United States of America

Re:

Post #30 made 1 year ago
joshua wrote:Scott, I have Stepped, Ramped, Single Infusion, and Reversed Mashed.

The Only noticeable difference has been the Reverse Mash (start High, and let it Cool).

The Original question was "How Much Precision Do You Use w/ Managing Mash Temperature?"  

My answer is, to Make "Beer", NONE.

To make a "Recipe" Beer, it is Very Important.  

To Duplicate a "Recipe", batch to batch, which is Very Difficult, it is Very Important.

If the "Recipe" says Mash at 145F/62C for an Hour, and then Mash at 157F/60C for 30 minutes, you Should, to make that "Style" Beer.

I only make "Beer".

JMHO.
I was obsessing about gravity at various points in my process last year when a wise poster replied: "we make beer, not numbers"
I have since learned to make great beer by having a consistent process and not worrying about every data point.
I select a mash temperature that corresponds to the style I want to brew and and adjust my strike temp accordingly. Insulate the kettle, stir at 30 minute intervals, heat to 165°F, pull and drain. It works for me. I make beer.
My only problem is I cannot make beer fast enough. I think my kegs allow too much evaporation as they empty faster than I can fill them.
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