Post #1601 made 5 years ago
Hi

I was bought Wheelers Brew Your Own British Real Ale for Christmas, I'm trying to scale the Everards Beacon recipe.

I'm a bit confused about volumes - he quotes 'Total liquor' and 'Mash liquor' - can anyone tell me how to use these volumes in the BIABacus.

I've attached my current version of the BIABacus, using the following recipe:

Everards Beacon
OG 1036
Vol 23 litres

Pale Malt - 2960g
Crystal Malt - 355g
White sugar - 175g
Torrefied Wheat - 105g

Challenger - 27g for 90 min
Fuggles - 9g for 10 min
Irish moss - 3g for 10 min

Total liquor - 31.7l
Mash liquor - 8.6l

Mash - 66C for 90 min
Boil - 90 min
FG - 1007
ABV 3.8
EBU 25
EBC 20

I've been tending to do 60 min mash and boil, just so I can fit a brew into an evening once the kids are in bed, so it's like that in the BIABacus intentionally.

Could someone please have a quick look over to see if I'm on the right track.

THanks

Keith
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Post #1602 made 5 years ago
Hi Duotwr

GW BYORA is a great book and I've brewed a few of the beers and they all turned out great.

I'm a bit short of time tonight so if you search my posts you will find GW mentioned in a few, which might give you more info but to get you going here's what I have worked out with regards to volumes and efficiency and how I apply it to Biabacus.

All GW's volumes i.e the 19L 23L and 25L columns in his recipes are EOBV. I have always assumed that this is EOBV NOT EOBV-A as the recipes always seem to scale better using EOBV and I can't see GW getting concerned about Hot/Ambient volumes. His efficiency is based on 75%.

As to scaling one of his recipes I usually pick the 23L column and use the grain/hop amounts as listed. I set my desired volume (VIF) to 19L in section B ( gives 23.06L in section K EOBV)and set the auto efficiency to 75% in section X. This lets me cross check the grain bill to see if I'm in the ball park and not made any major errors. Your grain bill will not be an exact match as Biabacus uses a slightly different extract potential numbers than GW but it will be close enough.(check my posts again as I recall writing about this a while back :think: ) I then delete the 75% so I revert to the auto efficiency setting and adjust the VIF to what I want.

With regard to the hop bill, you get a better match on the quantities if you set the EOBV-A in section D to 22.17 (for 23L recipes) rather than using the IBU Box.

Oh and I've just noticed the recipe contains some sugar. For this you need to adjust the sugar extract potential figures in section Y. Sugar is 100% fermentable and has no moisture content so set FDGB to 100% and MC to 0%

See how you get on, if you get stuck let me know and I'll post a Biabacus file for you.

:luck:

Yeasty
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Post #1603 made 5 years ago
Yeasty, thanks for the reply - I'd seen your name in various threads about GW recipes. It's a good looking book, and I'm happy to get some practice in making several beers from it, so need to get my BIABacus technique sorted out.

I've made some changes to my version of the file based on your suggestions. If you've got 5 minutes to have a look over it please, I'd be very grateful.

Thanks

Keith
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Post #1604 made 5 years ago
Good job Keith :clap:

Only a couple of things,

Your EOBV-A in section D should be 22.17 to copy the presumed EOBV-A of GW but 23 is close enough if you want to leave it. Hop IBU/EBU is a contentious subject so lets leave it at that :whistle: :sneak:

Again in section D your original hop bill design numbers should match GWs. page 21 has a hop list, just copy the AA% from there. Boil times should be as the original as well. The details of your hops and boil times go in the substitutions section. If its the same hop you can just add your AA%. If you are using a different hop add the name for reference. As you are dropping your boil time to 60 put 60 in the challenger line.

Looks good to go, get back to me if there is anything else.

:salute:

Yeasty
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Post #1605 made 5 years ago
Yeasty - thanks for the help. Looking good to make this tonight, or maybe at the weekend. Last BIAB I managed to get to bed before midnight, starting once the kids were in bed, so that means I can do more mid-week brewing!

Keith

Post #1606 made 5 years ago
Good morning all.
Over the holidays my wonderful wife got me a Caribou Slobber AG kit from Northern Brewer She is hoping that I can reproduce the Moose Drool ale she tried on one of her trips out west. Since this kit is a traditional AG I just wanted to make sure I'm on the right track as I'm doing BIAB and am not quite sure what if any differences I may encounter. Northern puts together smaller kits specifically for BIAB but not for this particular brew. I'm also trying to be better about using and understanding the BIABacus spreadsheet.
This will be my 2nd BIAB batch so I'm still very new to this. This is also my first batch where I an not following a more detailed recipe from the forum.
Couple of questions.
1. Am I missing anything obvious on the sheet that I need to compensate for because of BIAB vs traditional AG?
2. My kettle is a "not so correctly advertised" 10gal which comes in at an actual 9.6-9.7 gallons (theoretical 9.9)so by using 90 minutes as my boil time puts me over my kettle volume. I've compensated for this by adjusting the time to ~70 minutes but would rather use 90. Would it be advisable to stick with ~70 minutes and less volume (9.88 gal) or can I add water during the boil to offset the evaporation loss (10.25 gal total) so I can boil for 90 minutes?
3. Sec G says I'm supposed to do a secondary chilling. I'm unfamiliar with this so what is it and why do I need to do it?
$. In sec R the est FG was 1.016. How is this calculated if the only info given is the weight of the grains used and not any particular info on each grain.
Thanks for the help
M
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Post #1607 made 5 years ago
1. I don't think so, looks proper to me.
2. You could boil for 90, simply hold back 1G(or more) of the mash water, and then add it after you pull the bag. (Use Sec W./ Water Added Before Boil)
3. This depends of your chilling methods and fermentation temp requirements. Some cannot chill to pitching temperatures due to their tap water temperature. In the summer time, I had to use my fridge to get down those last few degrees. Also, my guess is that some would prefer their lagers be pitched at a low temp.
4. Section H. There is a default setting for yeast attenuation, I believe it's 75%. If you have experience with this particular mash temperature and yeast combo, you can ovveride in Section H. Until one gains experience with a recipe, I don't think there's a very accurate way to predict what will FG will finish at. The calculation might be more involved than that, but I don't see FG changing with mash temp. Somebody else would be able to answer this one better.
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Post #1608 made 5 years ago
I know that a 90-minute boil is advocated in BIABrewer.info, but lots of traditional AG folks do a 60-minute boil if there is no Pilsner malt. For me, I'd plug a 60-minute boil into the spreadsheet and go with that, since you have no Pilsner malt. I'm sure you will shortly see a follow-up posting saying to use a 90-minute boil. I can be a bit of an iconoclast, so take what I say with a grain of salt. :sneak:

Post #1609 made 5 years ago
There are many here who use 60 minute for boil. I think the 90 minute is more of a catch-all blanket statement for beginners, to insure their first brews be DMS free no matter what recipe is used.
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Post #1611 made 5 years ago
60 minutes will work on most beers. No worries. But in cases of a lager with lots of Pilsner. 90 minutes is preferred. I have been leaning towards 90 minutes for mashing and boiling just to extend my brew day. BIAB makes the time go bye so quickly. I need to extend my fun!
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Post #1612 made 5 years ago
I've been doing BIAB for a little over a year now and have 9 batches under my belt. I have regularly lurked on these forums and the HBT forums and gotten a lot of useful information from both. From the beginning I have used Beersmith and haven't had any issues hitting my numbers, but all my beers so far have been regular gravity (1.052-1.058) with grain bills in the 10-12# range for a 6 gallon batch.

I have been trying to give BIABacus a shot for my next batch and think I have my equipment setup correctly. I have a 15.5 US gallon keggle with a side pickup tube. I would like to see if the more knowledgeable here can give it a look over and see if I'm missing anything. This is going to be my first high gravity brew (19.5# grain bill) and I don't want to come in way low on my OG due to the inefficiencies inherent with large grain bills.

Attached is the recipe. The original grain bill is from my recipe in Beersmith. Am I assuming correctly that the "What you will use" column is what I need to adjust my grain bill for when ordering to actually hit my target OG? I also didn't have room in the Hop Bill to list all my hops that will be dry hopped and had to add them under Section F: Miscellaneous.

Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
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Post #1613 made 5 years ago
I can't help as I don't use any software. However BIABacus is the best thing going so you have a lot of people on this site that can answer questions. Just not me.
tap 1 Raspberry wine
tap 2 Bourbon Barrel Porter
tap 3 Czech Pilsner
tap 4 Triple IPA 11% ABV

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Post #1614 made 5 years ago
Ramarok wrote:This is going to be my first high gravity brew (19.5# grain bill) and I don't want to come in way low on my OG due to the inefficiencies inherent with large grain bills.

Attached is the recipe. The original grain bill is from my recipe in Beersmith. Am I assuming correctly that the "What you will use" column is what I need to adjust my grain bill for when ordering to actually hit my target OG? I also didn't have room in the Hop Bill to list all my hops that will be dry hopped and had to add them under Section F: Miscellaneous.

Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
Your file looks perfect to me, from the 90 mins. boil, 90 mins. mash and the mash-out, all spot-on....

Definitely use the grain bill "what you will use" and trust the auto-efficiency of 72%.

Make sure you use two packets of yeast.

Let us know how it goes!!!

:peace:
MS
Last edited by Mad_Scientist on 28 Jan 2014, 03:29, edited 6 times in total.
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Post #1615 made 5 years ago
Hello all,

I made my first Maxi-BIAB batch on Christmas Day, using information cobbled together from around the net--then I found BIABrewer.

I have done a ton of reading here, and in working with the Abacus it is clear what a fantastic amount of work has been put into this tool. Unfortunately, I am using OpenOffice on a Mac, and I think there are hidden comments I can't see (probably time for me to upgrade and reinstall...). But, amazing work, and I give great thanks to this community.

I understand MaxiBIAB does not take full advantage of the awesomeness of BIAB, and I think I won't do Maxi for long. But, our family does a whole lot of Back to Basics type stuff (check out my website http://www.smallanddeliciouslife.com/) so we already have a lot of equipment and not enough storage. For this reason, and for the benefit of people in the same bind I am in, I would like to stick with using my canning kettle for now.

I have tried to fill out the Abacus with the next two recipes I would like to try. Questions came up, so I wanted to ask some advice and see if someone could look at my files and see if I am missing something.

I hope I am following the correct posting procedures and etiquette--apologies if I am not.

I am following the recommendation to start from Brewing Classic Styles, and have selected the Belgian Pale Ale, and the American IPA.

So, questions:

1.
Brewing Classic Styles gives me IBUs, but I don't see how to incorporate that in the case of hops substitutions. I have noted my AA%. Should I be worried/learning about IBUs?

2.
Why is my Belgian Ale grain bill calculated smaller than the recipe? The IPA recipe is adjusted larger, which I assume is the compensation for loss of efficiency with the MaxiBIAB method.

3.
Belgian Yeast--Brewing Classic Styles calls for White WLP515 Antwerp Ale or Wyeast 3655 Belgian Schelde. I can get a Wyeast Kolsch or Wyeast Belgian Saison 3724 locally. Or I may be able to get Fermentis S33 Belgian Ale dry yeast in the next city. Any suggestions for substitutions?

4.
Where does 0 Minute hopping fit with a MaxiBIAB mashout?

Thanks again. I look forward to any and all comments.
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Last edited by porkpie on 28 Jan 2014, 03:40, edited 6 times in total.

Post #1616 made 5 years ago
Short on time but here's some stuff for Ramarok first and then porkpie second.

Ramarok: Your brew is very high gravity. The BIABacus auto-efficiency estimates are less tested at high ends of the gravity scale*. See this post for more detail.

What this is saying, is that there might not be enough water to wash the "sugars" out of your grain. You may need to be prepared to do on of the following...

1. Add DME.
2. Add more water to your grain and then increase your boil time to get rid of that extra water.

Check the gravity of your sweet liquor at the end of the mash and then again at amsh-out. If both the readings fall well below 1.067/9 be prepared to dump the bag in again with say another 5 litres of water (or sparge it in a different vessel with water at about 78 C) and then increase your boil time by whatever is the appropriate time given your new gravity.

Alternatively, if both readings fall low, you can just increase your boil time but end up with less beer at the end of the day.

* From memory (not 100% sure), the few people who have done a high gravity brew of around 1.090 have done okay with the BIAbacus defaults so you'll probably be okay :peace:. (Take some measurements on the day and let us know how you go.)

porkpie: Here you go...

Q1.Do as explained here.

Q2. Follow the advice I have just written here. Allow lots of time and then come back here if you have more questions.

Q3. Go the dried yeast I reckon.

Q4. Not sure about your last question. Hold on, I just downloaded one of your files and now I am :). BIBAcaus automatically adjusts for maxi-BIAB stuff so no worries there but...

You are using too much water diluted in the fermentor I think. (BIABacus has a warning for this but it isn't working in PR 1.3. Try and find a PR 1.3K). I can't spend any more time on this problem right now. Try searching my posts for any of the following though...

"sweet liquor shop posts" "juggling" "extreme brewing" "asking too much from your kettle"

Let me know if you come across some posts that help here otherwise when I get some time, I'll see if I can dig them up.

:peace:
PP
Last edited by PistolPatch on 28 Jan 2014, 07:37, edited 6 times in total.
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Post #1617 made 5 years ago
Thanks PistolPatch.

I added the IBU tweak you mentioned and read the linked posts, and the links within the links.

I also did the advanced searches and read the several posts that came up. I have done those searches before and read most of those posts already.

But, I still don't understand...here are all the smileys that seem related: :scratch: :think: :? :dunno: :interesting: :o :shock: :headhit: :sneak: :nup: :sad: :cry: :blush: :| :?: :!:

Hope the emoticons help... :lol:

Anyhow, the questions:

1. Why is my grain bill lower with Maxi. I thought Maxi was less efficient (sweet liquor shop posts) and therefore the grain bill would go up. This is related to #2 below.

2. I see that if I don't sparge, my kettle overflows. But, by my math, if I follow the Abacus I need to boil off three gallons of water, which seems extreme. Is that actually accurate and what is needed to achieve the OG? I tried reducing my OG, but that just cut the grain bill but not the water demand. If I reduce the sparge, my kettle overflows and the grain bill still doesn't change, which surprises me.

3. Where does the sparge water go? I can see the sparge water is magically filling up the space taken up after I pull the grain bag, but that is only a few litres, not ten litres. When I try to shift the sparge water to additions before and after the boil, the water bill just increases.

4. When do I sparge? Or is mashout no longer recommended? Before I found this site I made a Maxi batch. I mashed, then mashed-out, then sparged, then added the sparge liquor to the boil, then topped up with plain water.

Post #1618 made 5 years ago
The emoticons did help porkpie ;),

That's great that you have done the reading :peace:. Let's have a look...
1. Why is my grain bill lower with Maxi. I thought Maxi was less efficient (sweet liquor shop posts) and therefore the grain bill would go up. This is related to #2 below.
Only dilutions lower kettle efficiency, not sparging. (Remember, it is the amount of water that touches the grain that makes a difference.) So, your grain bill will not change at all if you put a value in, 'Water Used in a Sparge'. It will increase though with everything below that line in Section W, in other words, with any sweet liquor or wort dilutions.

You said your grain bill gets lower though. Not sure why you are saying that? Can you give me some examples / post the two files? That should not happen at all.

....

Until we get the last para sorted, there isn't much point delving into Q's 2 to 4 except...

I have written some posts here on why you should hardly ever consider sparging. Have you seen those? They would definitely answer a few of your sub-questions above.

....

One of the beauties of BIAB is it is so much simpler in its process than traditional brewing. Full-volume variations (what we used to call 'maxi-BIAB') has all the complexities of traditional brewing and very little beauty of BIAB. Education-wise, I think every brewer should understand full-volume brewing (pure BIAB) first. Firstly, if they did, they would end up saving themselves a heap of labour. equipment and trouble. Secondly, they'd probably understand what the brewing process is actually about.

In small and delicious life, I see you make your own bread (sourdough like me). If you want two loaves of bread, can you put the right amount of flour in but half as much water? Can you then cook that very stiff dough in one single bread tin? Can you then dilute it with water to suddenly magically make two loaves? Of course, you can't.

I'm exaggerating a bit above but I am trying to really emphasise that you can't get a million litres of beer out of a 10 litre kettle. In fact, you can't even get 19 litres of beer out of a 19 litre kettle without it costing you a lot more equipment, labour and ingredients.

I reckon advanced search my posts with 'equipment labour ingredients'. That should bring up a few essays porky ;).

So, a few things above there to sort for now.

:peace:
PP
Last edited by PistolPatch on 28 Jan 2014, 18:41, edited 6 times in total.
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Post #1619 made 5 years ago
Thanks for the reply PistolPatch....and thanks for inventing BIAB. :thumbs:

The sourdough comparison is maybe not the best. I was thinking of tea. I was told the Russians brew a very strong tea concentrate, and then when they want a cup, they dilute it with boiling water from the kettle on the back of the stove.

So, that makes sense to me, and fits from an extraction perspective with your examples of dirty jeans in a washing machine.

By the grain bill getting smaller, I mean the original recipe calls for 6687 grams of grain and "what I will use" calls for 6649.

Now, the recipe was scaled for a six gallon fermenter I believe, and I only have a five, so I can see the bill going down a bit. But on the flip side, my total water is standing at 7.85 gallons.

So, yeah, I get that this is killing much of the awesomeness of BIAB. I can tell you my Christmas Stout, which I made BIAB in my canning kettle and diluted down to probably 2% alcohol still tastes fantastic!

After I have done a couple of batches as a beer tourist, I will buy another bag and split a full BIAB between my TWO canning kettles--which will reduce both our headaches. :pray:

Thanks again.

Post #1620 made 5 years ago
Oops. And here is the file. Last night I reduced the dilution to be in line with the 30% maximum suggestion.

Cheers.
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Post #1621 made 5 years ago
Ha! That sourdough analogy was about the worst I have ever come up with :P.

Re the 6687 grams versus 6649 grams, I'd have to see the original recipe to answer that properly but remember, you should not expect the weight of your grain bill to be the same as the original recipe as some or all of the following things will be different...

1. Desired Volume into Fermentor
2. Kettle Efficiency
3. Kettle to Ferementor Loss (KFL)
4. Fermentor to Packaging Loss (FPL)

Read a bit of this thread. At the bottom of post #9 it talks a bit about 'batch size'. I bet in the recipe you are copying, it is either impossible or almost impossible to determine 1 and 3. Add these two together and you will get what we call your 'End of Boil Volume - Ambient (EOBV-A)' in BIABacus PR 1.3 or, in later versions, 'Volume of Ambient Wort (VAW). This is the most important volume figure in a recipe and nearly all recipe reports, books etc lack it. Unless they do have it, you can't compare like with like (or get the hop bill to match with accuracy).

...

In the file you uploaded above, see how there is a warning in Section B? Your mash volume is too high. You are still asking way too much from your kettle especially when the beer requires an OG of 1.065 :nup:.

I've made some changes and attached the file below. Even that is pushing it though. Somewhere here, I have written some instructions/checklist on, when you are forced to vary from full-volume, how you should go about it. Maybe a search of "Water Added During Boil" would come up with the goods. Might have been a year or so ago.

I was hoping my posts with "juggle" or "juggling" might have scored you some goods already on this area.

I asked earlier if you came across posts that helped if you could let me know. You did that but I should have said link them as well as it will make them easier for others to find (and me). Did nothing come up on maxi-BIAB stuff when you searched for juggling and extreme brewing porky? If not, try the "Water Added During Boil" thing and if you strike gold, give us the link please.

;)
PP

P.S. Brews like this, you really need PR 1.3 K as more essential warnings work in it.
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Post #1622 made 5 years ago
Still don't understand Maxi and the Abacus.

Wow. I keep staring at my Abacus and changing numbers. I keep re-reading Ralph's guide, and re-reading linked posts and trying to figure things out, and it still doesn't make sense.

I don't see where sparge water is accounted for being added back into the boil. Primarily, I don't see where that water shows up in the water bill, and I am worried because it carries sugars that I need.

Can anybody tell me where that sparge water is accounted for? The recipe in Brewing Classic Styles says 7 gallons should make 5.5 gallons into the fermenter. The Abacus is telling me I need 7.5 gallons to get 5 gallons into the fermenter, which means I have lost a gallon.

That gallon can't be stuck to a larger grain bill, because my grain has shrunk 700 grams.

I am confused.
Last edited by porkpie on 30 Jan 2014, 08:34, edited 6 times in total.

Post #1623 made 5 years ago
I'm a bit worried porkpie that you are reading too fast. I've asked for some specific feedback in some posts above but haven't had any response yet so am worried that you might not be reading my answers in full, allowing enough time. (Going through your post above, I'm not even sure you have downloaded my file above :think:. It's very hard to know if what I am spending ages writing is helping you at all.)

I'll just go through your post above line by line and let's see if we get anywhere. Firstly, there is no 'Abacus' only a 'BIABacus' :lol:.

In Ralph's guide you will see a note that it is 'extreme brewing'. He has through a lot of manual labour, mucking around and additional vessels managed to get a normal gravity brew out of a 19 L pot. I said above, you are not even doing a normal gravity brew, you are doing a high gravity brew (1.065). Do you understand why it is harder to get a 1.065 brew out of a small pot than a 1.050 brew?

Sparge water goes into the kettle before the boil not during it and it is accounted for. Let's have a look at my file...

You have in Section K TWN of 24.92 L and in Section W you are holding back 13.75 L from the mash.

24.92 - 13.75 = 11.17 L

Heat 11.017 L to mash temperature and it will swell to 11.39 L

Add that to your grain and your kettle will be about 15.8 L full.

Drain the grain and it will still hold about 0.6 litres for every kg of grain you added. 15.8L - 0.6 * 5.897 = 15.8 L - 3.54 L = 12.3 L.

Now add the sparge water of 5 L. 12.3 L + 5 L = 17.3 L which is close enough to the 17.13 L you see in Section K. (The slight difference is due to some rounding stuff I haven't bothered with.)

So, sparge water all accounted for!

...

7 gallons versus 5.5 gallons and 7.5 gallons versus 5 gallons. [Not sure what file you are talking about here as the latter should be 7.85 gallons not 7.5).

Many reasons for this.

Firstly, your kettle is not the same as that used in BCS. Don't expect your evaporation rate to match anyone else's.

Secondly, your boil time is 90 minutes (as it should be) whereas BCS assumes a 60 minute boil for all brews.

Thirdly, (does not apply here), BCS assumes that you have the same kettle efficiency for every brew you do regardless of its gravity. This is not correct. As you noted, this does not apply here but will do so in other cases.

Fourthly, your KFL is a bit higher than that in BCS.

Finally and mainly!!!, BCS assumes that every brew you do starts is an extract and starts with 7 gallons. Whether it be a 1.038 brew or a 1.065 brew, the book says you start with 7 gallons. But the higher brew requires almost twice as much grain! Therefore it will also sponge up (retain) more water. Therefore you will need more water to start (about 3/4 of a gallon actually.)

So there you go ;),
PP
Last edited by PistolPatch on 30 Jan 2014, 17:30, edited 6 times in total.
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Post #1624 made 5 years ago
Thanks for this PistolPatch.

Have you seen this video on compounding German words? It is about Barbara who has a bar that serves barbarians... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gG62zay3kck

That is a bit how I feel when I try to type BIABacus. My brain always twists a bit in my skull as I try to figure out how many 'ab's I have typed already. :dunno:

I have been thinking about your request for helpful posts. I have bookmarked several of them, but there are also many that I just read and closed. I spent quite a bit of time reading when I found this site so I have quite a mishmash of information in my head... But, I will try to put together a useful list.

Your explanation above clears up a lot of things for me. Especially:

1) grain holds about .6 litre of water per kilo. So six kilos holds one gallon, which is a whole lot of water.

2) and, as you say, BCS recipes are from extract. I hadn't thought about that at all. They tell you how to convert to all-grain, and I hadn't thought that would still effect many other things.

So, I think I have a vague idea of the process from start to finish, rather than having large and total gaps in my comprehension.

It is very good to hear about all the different factors that make my BIAB-acus ;-) recipe look different. I was assuming it was just because I was making mistakes and didn't understand. Turns out it was just that I didn't understand... So, Trust in the Force.

I do get that it is harder to do a Full Volume Variation with a higher-gravity beer (back to the dirty jeans in a washing machine).

And I apologize again for how I am approaching this. I know the wise thing to do would be to start with regular BIAB and make several batches until I get my feet, then experiment with FVV. What can I say? I regularly make unwise decisions. :)

So. How about I ditch the idea of making a 19L FVV of high-gravity IPA. My wife likes Belgian, so here is my BIAB-acus of the BCS Antwerp Afternoon.

It is lower gravity, and has a smaller grain bill, which puts it in the efficiency zone Ralph has written about--approx 4.5 kgs of grain for a 19L batch.

So, my kettle (canning pot) is actually 20L. I will mash with 15L, and add the grain, which will fill my pot to the brim. I will pull the bag and sparge with 10L. I should be able to put 2-3 litres of sparge into the kettle right away and begin the boil. Over the next hour I will add what I can, probably another 3-4 litres, then let the boil finish for half an hour with no more dilutions. Cool it and transfer to my carboy, top it up with four litres of water.

Does that seem less extreme?

Still a couple of questions. Mashout--do you still do that before a sparge? So, do I mash, then mashout, then pull the bag and sparge?

And second, I know the magic of BIAB is one pot brewing and sparging adds another vessel. But, should I just throw my 10L of sparge water on the stove and boil it while I boil the wort? That would concentrate it and should give me a higher gravity sparge to add to my wort. Is there anything wrong with that other than the hassle?

Phew. After I have played around with FVV a little I will be trying out using two canning kettles to make true full-volume batches, just split into two pots (since I already own them). Hopefully that will make me less of a pain in the butt.

Thanks again for all of your help.
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Last edited by porkpie on 31 Jan 2014, 05:09, edited 6 times in total.

Post #1625 made 5 years ago
porkpie wrote:Have you seen this video on compounding German words? It is about Barbara who has a bar that serves barbarians... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gG62zay3kck
I have now :). Very good porky :peace:.

If you want some more ideas on the process, see here and here. They may help.

As for your new process, it is a bit less extreme but you really want to be boiling all your wort for at least 60 minutes and preferably 90. So, yes, get the wort boiling in a second pot. What this will do though is effectively increase your evaporation rate as you will be boiling in two kettles and have therefore, a lot more surface area. To compensate for this, in your second kettle, just keep topping it up so it stays the same depth.

In your file, you have the first two lines of Section D filled out. For a BCS recipe, just use the second line so delete the 22.70.

And did I mention using PR 1.3K as a few important warnings don't work in PR 1.3?

All else looks good fella ;),
PP
Last edited by PistolPatch on 01 Feb 2014, 18:20, edited 6 times in total.
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