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I am converting a stout recipe that uses lactose. I entered the lactose into the grain bill. In Section Y, for the lactose I set FGDB = 100% and MC = 0.0. As far as I can tell, this allows the OG calculations to work correctly for scaling the recipe. Lactose does not require any additional water in ...

OK, PP, I hope you are sitting down. I think I understand. Things have advanced greatly while I have been out of the loop! :thumbs: Based on several brews, though, I will have to change my evaporation rate in Section X. For my pot size and burner, I consistently get an evaporation rate higher than w...

Should the grain amounts change when I change the boil time from 60 minutes to 90 minutes? I have a BAIABacus PR1.3 recipe where this happens. From process point of view, I cannot think why changing the boil time would change the grain bill (given that the BIABacus adjusts the water volume for the l...

Copied over from "BIABacus Pre-Release - Your First Impressions" forum. I'm not sure if this is the right place to post this question. Please let me know if there is a better forum. Starting with the posted NRB's All Amarillo APA recipe fom BIABacus PR1.3, I played with the efficiency in Section X u...

Checked BB&B yesterday. It looks like that bag was on clearance. The new bags have very large holes. If anybody finds the one pictured at the top of this thread, I'd be happy to reimburse you if you are willing to buy it and mail it to me! I found the one pictured below and it looks interesting. I h...

The lauter loss %ge is always higher when absorption is higher, but as the liquor to grain ratio increases the loss decreases across the board Sorry, Stux, I got flipped a bit when I was looking at the graph. Now I think I understand. The absorption rate for traditional mash tuns is higher than for...

Zooms OK in Firefox. Does the Lauter Loss for traditional brewing assume a sparge, or is this just what you get when you drain the wort off of the grains? I am confused. A higher absorption means that more liquid is left behind in the grains. Why does that lead to lower lautering losses? Shouldn't t...

Hops Increments

When I buy hops in pre-measured packages in the US, they typically come in 1-ounce packages. Of course, when I scale a recipe, it never comes out in even 1-ounce increments. What is the pre-measured package size for hops in the rest of the world? I am also curious about how other brewers handle thes...

PP, As a variant on the old "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach." I'd like to propose: Those who can, brew. Those who can't, type. I can't often get the 5 hours it takes me for a brew day (especially while sitting at work), but I can find 5 minutes to type about brewing. I fear that I've drag...

I suspect that MHB slipped a decimal point or a metric prefix in his writeup. This site gives trub weight at 200 to 400 g/hL, which is 2-4g/l. That is in line with MHB's 1.64 g/l and he is going by the "bible" of brewing textbooks.

Actually, 0.00164 is correct. I checked it on a calculator to make sure that the math in my head was correct. I think that the break material that is no longer in solution is actually a reasonable explanation for why the efficiencies would not match. Using MHB's example above, if you were targeting ...

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