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Bob Brews, donya for not trash talking the other guy, but instead just doing what you were doing in a competent fashion. For those of us doing stovetop half-batches, the weight of the bag isn't even an issue! I highly recommend that anyone doing stovetop brewing try BIAB. And, has been pointed out, ...

The standard wisdom is that you need to do several (let's say at least five) brews to be sure of your process. Either of the efficiencies you obtained could have been a fluke. When your efficiencies are consistent, then adjust your recipes accordingly.

I agree that it is easy to get caught up in numbers and calculations instead of focusing on making beer. Unfortunately, I can more easily play with numbers than make beer during my lunch break. So, given that I'm eating lunch, I'll talk numbers. ;) Because I use an immersion chiller in my brewpot, I...

Personally, I wouldn't worry about aluminum. I use an aluminum kettle for my brews. I guess you could boil or bake an aluminum rack to get the black coating on it as suggested for "seasoning" an aluminum pot. If you are buying instead of scrounging, you might find a big colander from a restaurant su...

My brews so far have been ranged from OG 1.053 to OG 1.069, so as has been pointed out, I should expect EIK to vary among these brews. I'm glad to know that a trained (universtity-educated) brewer has an explanation of the difference between EIK and EOB Efficiency. OK, I went back and found the "99%...

Do Your Efficiencies Match?

My Efficiency into Kettle (EIK) never matches my End of Boil Efficiency. The latter is always a couple of points lower. Yes, I do adjust my gravity readings for temperature. Does anyone else experience this? On a related note, I am getting a fairly consistent EIK of around 80%. In a different thread...

From my teenage camping days, I remember warnings that refrigerator grates were not food-safe. Of course, that was a long time ago when the grates were probably galvanized steel. I have no idea what they are made of now.

Joshua--Thanks! Although a weizen might be clear, a hefeweizen should have the yeast in it. That is why it is a "hefe" ("yeast") weizen! At least that's the way I learned it. Yes, I was worried that the rests would break down the proteins too much and that the head would be decreased and/or not last...

Multiple Rests

I found this recipe for a Weissbier on the Weyermann site. It has multiple temperature rests, which I should be able to do by heating and stirring the pot at each stage. (A bonus for BIAB, I'd say!) My question: Do you really think all these rests are necessary with modern grains? I would think that...

Stux--Thanks. I really didn't think about using zero, then adding back the water that I need. Kostass--I did mention coming up with my own numbers. I was looking for a starting point and wondering if it were possible to suggest one for someone's use the first time they try a simmer brew, similar to ...

I just realized that this same question was asked in December. Sorry about the repeat! On my last brew, I noticed a 2 F (1 C) temperature drop in about 20 minutes, so I plan to do a stir, check, and temperature adjust every 20 minutes. I can't prove it, but I still think there would be value to stir...

Good point. I will boil the bag in the future. As it turns out, for this last batch I forgot to empty the grains after the mash, so I grabbed an unused bag (I use 5 gal paint strainer bags), gave it a hot rinse, and sprayed it with sanitizer. (I use Iodophor.) I got lucky on my last batch (an APA) w...

Do You Strain and Squeeze?

For context, I am brewing stovetop half (2.5 gal) batches. After I pull and squeeze the bag of grain, I dump the grain, rinse the bag, and shake it out. (I'm pretty sure everyone does this. ;) ) After I have chilled the wort, I put the bag in my bucket and pour the wort in, using the bag to strain o...

Effect of Mash Temperature on Extraction Efficiency

Two brews ago, my mash temp got away from me (I didn't allow for continued heating from the electric coils on my stove after turning the burner off) and I mashed at 158 F. My extraction efficiency was 77%. With yesterday's brew, I paid attention and mashed at 154 F. That brew had an efficiency of 85...

My way of thinking is that there are (at least) two reason to stir: achieve good distribution of the enzymes and achieve an even temperature distribution in the mash. If these are true, then: If all of your grains have full diastatic power, then stirring probably doesn't matter much. On the other ha...

Stir at the start to balance the temperature and ensure there are no dough balls. Cover, insulate and leave it alone for 90 minutes. Same here. Having to stir during the mash would cut into my nap time. :sleep: Full disclosure: I have a recirculation pump rigged up that allows me to "stir" my mash ...

Stir During Mash?

Do you stir during a 60- or 90-minute mash? How often? I'm wondering because it would seem that stirring would make enzymes more readily available to all the grains (including the low diastatic power ones). But on the other hand, every time you open the pot and stir, you lose heat. So, don't stir at...

tjthebest wrote:Thanks guys, i just ended up using the convert formula and made a new column at the end that shows the gallons and stuff.

Its a great little calculator.
Could you post your version?

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