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Nice one MS! I'm quite partial to a Belikin myself. Depending on where you are travelling in Belize, check out the shops and supermarkets for different beers as well. There are still some British bases in Belize and they import stuff for the squaddies. They also try to cater for American tastes on t...

Hello do_you_realise, Just to add to one of the things that PistolPatch said with regard to the low temperature. I found this BYO article about stout really helpful on this subject: https://byo.com/stories/item/572-dry-irish-stout-style-profile. I know you are brewing an Amarillo Pale Ale, but the a...

You're not picking nits, so no worries! I only brought up Janet's because it was mentioned on post 6 and 8, and wanted to share my experience. But to pick a nit back - Janet's Brown isn't an American Brown either - too high in gravity, alcohol and hopping. When I put it into competition, it's Categ...

@rick My favourite example is Theakston's Old Peculiar, but I'm surprised at how low a gravity that is - just over 5% I always thought it was six or more. In my experience of drinking them, a warm higher gravity and lots of character might be a rough and ready description. @rigging Its years since I...

@joshua My questions were actually rhetorical, but its interesting that you mention malts and yeasts, but not the hop bill. Ray Daniels certainly does talk about hops in his book. He also mentions there are a lot of variations in a given style, and he given averages, not the cut and dried percentage...

@joshua I suppose that depends on how much importance you place on stylistic differences - from that point of view you might argue that Leffe Brune is a Brown Ale - its brown after all (I have one in front of me), and its malty and lightly hopped. When does Brown Ale becomes a Porter?, and what poin...

I've done Janet's Brown on both three vessel and BIAB, and just adjusted for efficiency and system losses using BeerSmith. Came out great both ways with (in my mind) no significant difference in taste. I'm brewing it again on Tuesday for a Homebrewing class I'm teaching, using BIAB. Hello BlackIsla...

Celeryness, would you mind posting the BIABacus you used here? Hello Rigging, I've only done 4 BIAB brews and I'm pretty sure that this Brown Ale one went a bit south as I said, so it might not be wise to post that BIABacus in a public forum. Also, I haven't even bottled it yet so I can't say what ...

My favourite was always Newcastle Brown Ale. I was after making some just recently and looking round for a clone recipe. Something that I found though is apparently Newcastle is actually a blend of an Old Ale and an Amber Ale, so that makes it more difficult to clone a recipe. These ideas from BYO d...

@PistolPatch Thanks for the private message mate. I felt that after my initial post and further response I was pushing this thread too far away from its original discussion on general boil time considerations, and I was just happy to move on. I also think I made a mistake in mentioning the BIABacus ...

@bundy Thanks very much for chipping in on that. Like I said above - its something that one might want to consider, nothing more. I expect if you were brewing in Cusco in Peru (3,400m), another bigger concern might be the lack of oxygen, rather than just an extended boil. My take on this is that if ...

I hope this is appropriate to add to this thread on the subject of boil times, but this also might have a bearing on the BIABacus as well. I've not seen a mention so far to altitude in terms of calculation of boil times, and not wanting to be too anal, but to a certain extent (and depending on how h...

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