The Basics of Kegging

Assumes carbonation of flat beer is done using a forced or gradual injection of CO2.
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The Basics of Kegging

Post by BIABrewer » 7 years ago

All brewers, new and experienced, are encouraged to start new topics in this section provided they have read the below. This section is still being structured. A temporary thread can be found here For now, post your suggestions here or in the thread above and we will tidy up this section as we go along. Don't be offended if your post gets deleted later. If of value, it will have been incorporated somewhere before being deleted and, if possible have given you credit.
All brewers, new and experienced, are encouraged to start new topics in this section provided they have read the above.
Last edited by BIABrewer on 17 Apr 2010, 15:31, edited 18 times in total.


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Post by Beachbum » 7 years ago

Erm I submitted an article on kegging (with photos) some time ago and it seems to have disappeared?

MODNOTE: Have finally posted it on the board BeachBum (see post above for link) and sorry for the massive delay.
Last edited by Beachbum on 06 Jul 2010, 17:16, edited 18 times in total.

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Post by shibolet » 7 years ago

I'm getting into kegging and would appreciate any info you could provide.
are ball luck cornys better that pin lock?
i have a regulator that reads in BAR. how do i covert?
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fermenter: Sourdough Spelt Ale, Classic Lambic, Oud Brune, Barrel Aged Belgian Dubbel
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Post by wizard78 » 7 years ago

1 BAR = 100 kpa = 14.504 psi
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Post by SacSoul » 7 years ago

wizard78 wrote:1 BAR = 100 kpa = 14.504 psi
You forgot torr, atm, and mm Hg ;)
Last edited by SacSoul on 06 Oct 2010, 20:31, edited 18 times in total.
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Post by shibolet » 7 years ago

well i got a used CO2 canister with a regulator that reads BAR on a scale of 1 to 30. i guess i'll have to replace it for something with a higher resolution.
I have also found a fellow homebrewer that will sell me two pin lock cornys as he's got 6 other ball lock ones.
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Post by wizard78 » 7 years ago

SacSoul wrote:
wizard78 wrote:1 BAR = 100 kpa = 14.504 psi
You forgot torr, atm, and mm Hg ;)
1 BAR = 100 kpa = 14.504 psi = 1.02 Atmospheres = 750.062 Torr :lol:

Edit: formatting
Last edited by wizard78 on 07 Oct 2010, 17:21, edited 18 times in total.
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Post by shibolet » 7 years ago

I just figured out that my regulator read in "Liters per Minute"
which is a flow rate and not a pressure measurement.
can i still use the regulator for kegging?
Cube:
fermenter: Sourdough Spelt Ale, Classic Lambic, Oud Brune, Barrel Aged Belgian Dubbel
Kegs: Bob's Black IPA, Blanc Blond, Soda...
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Post by wizard78 » 7 years ago

Sounds like you have a welding regulator with a flowmeter. You will need a regulator that reads low pressure. Does your reg. have 2 gauges on it? Can you post a picture?
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Post by shibolet » 7 years ago

Sorry, I don't have a picture of the regulator handy. However, I found a local shop that deals in gas supplies. I bought a replacement gauge for the regulator that reads in PSI (0-35).
Cost me around 10$us. Also bought six meters of food grade tubing. I am almost ready to keg my first beer!
Cube:
fermenter: Sourdough Spelt Ale, Classic Lambic, Oud Brune, Barrel Aged Belgian Dubbel
Kegs: Bob's Black IPA, Blanc Blond, Soda...
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Post by hashie » 7 years ago

Good luck with it Shib. How are you planning on carbonating your beers once they are in the kegs? will you force or naturally carb?
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Post by shibolet » 7 years ago

i am thinking of force carbonation.
otherwise i'll end up with yeast sediment. no?
Cube:
fermenter: Sourdough Spelt Ale, Classic Lambic, Oud Brune, Barrel Aged Belgian Dubbel
Kegs: Bob's Black IPA, Blanc Blond, Soda...
to be brewed:

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Post by shibolet » 7 years ago

can i force carbonate at room temp? i don't have the fridge space to chill the keg right now.
if i do naturally carb, do i use the same amount of priming sugar as with bottles?
Cube:
fermenter: Sourdough Spelt Ale, Classic Lambic, Oud Brune, Barrel Aged Belgian Dubbel
Kegs: Bob's Black IPA, Blanc Blond, Soda...
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Post by hashie » 7 years ago

Sediment??? Maybe. I naturally carb my kegs and it is really only the first couple of pints that have any sediment, if any. After that they are all bright. You probably can force carb at room temperature, but it works best if the beer is chilled.

No you don't use the same amount of sugar as for bottle priming. It is about half the amount that you need. For example I never use more than 76 grams of sugar to prime a keg, but I would need around 150 grams of sugar for the same volume of beer going into bottles.

Hope that helps.
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Post by PistolPatch » 7 years ago

:hashie: - I always force carb so know nothing about naturally carbonating kegs. That's weird you only have to use half the amount. What's the reason for that?

:shib: - I always force carb. Doing this at room temp will be much harder though as the CO2 does not absorb as easily at the higher temps. There are two ways around this...

1. Add an extra gas line - Once you have kegged, add an extra gas line to your warm keg. Have this at the same pressure as the beers inside your keg. It will eventually carb up but it might take two weeks as, if you do it this way with cold kegs, it still takes nearly a week.

2. As soon as your keg is chilled (about a day in the fridge usually to bring it from 18 C to serving temp), force carb it. If you want to drink it straight after force carbing, pour it into a jug first and let it settle. The keg should come good to pour in a very short time anyway (often as little as an hour.)

Cheers
PP
Last edited by PistolPatch on 18 Oct 2010, 06:51, edited 18 times in total.
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Post by hashie » 7 years ago

Hey PP, you only use half so you don't over carb the keg :P

Seriously though, I can't give you a technical answer, you just do. Even beersmith recognises this.

76 grams of sugar in a 19 litre keg gives me 2.4 volumes of carbonation in my beers that are ready to drink in 2 weeks. If force carbing takes 1-2 weeks, why bother doing it? It's just using more gas ($$$)
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Post by PistolPatch » 7 years ago

Wow, that is weird! Glad you piped up about this old mate as I can so easily see myself doing an authoritave post saying, "Just do the same as bottles!"

Phew!!!

Still don't understand it but :).
Last edited by PistolPatch on 18 Oct 2010, 21:15, edited 18 times in total.
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Post by shibolet » 7 years ago

well, i ended up with 19L in the keg and another four 750ml.
I primed the keg with 50gr of corn sugar and gave it a good bit of CO2 too.
i hope it all turns out.
Cube:
fermenter: Sourdough Spelt Ale, Classic Lambic, Oud Brune, Barrel Aged Belgian Dubbel
Kegs: Bob's Black IPA, Blanc Blond, Soda...
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Post by widdley » 7 years ago

Hey Shib,

I know a little trick that will help you out (force carbing)... Not sure who originally worked this out but it works a treat...

Given you've got no fridge space, just pressurize the keg a little and bleed for a bit to expel air and ensure that the gas space is all CO2 and that the lid seals properly. Store to condition for what ever period you deem appropriate.

Then when you're ready to chill (and drink) it...
Chuck the keg in the fridge for a day or two to cool then attach a beer out connector to your CO2 supply and plug it into the keg - that way when you carb the gas goes in at the bottom. Crank up the gas and you'll hear it going in to the keg then stop after about 10 seconds. Now rock the keg gently form side to side and you'll hear more gas flow in. Do this for a couple of minutes then let it rest for about 10. Then try the beer to see if its carbed enough for you tastes - if not repeat the process...

Doing it this way I can take a keg full of flat cold beer to nicely carbed and drinkable in less than an hour!

I'm sure it breaks some laws of nature and is considered heresy by some but WTF it works for me :D

Give it a crack

Dave
Last edited by widdley on 20 Oct 2010, 06:32, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by shibolet » 7 years ago

Thanks!
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fermenter: Sourdough Spelt Ale, Classic Lambic, Oud Brune, Barrel Aged Belgian Dubbel
Kegs: Bob's Black IPA, Blanc Blond, Soda...
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Post by Lylo » 6 years ago

How full should I be filling the kegs?
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Post by shibolet » 6 years ago

fill no higher than the end of the gas inlet
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Kegs: Bob's Black IPA, Blanc Blond, Soda...
to be brewed:


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Post by Lylo » 6 years ago

I thought this was sort of strange.I just picked up 2 kegs,(my first)adn 1 of them has an inlet tube abput 3 inches long and the other is only about an inch long.Should I worry and stay on edge?
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Post by wizard78 » 6 years ago

That doesn't seem right, the outlet tube should just about touch the bottom of the keg and the inlet should be about 1" to 2" long.
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Post by wizard78 » 6 years ago

Sorry I think I've misunderstood your post Lylo, if you mean the two different kegs have different length inlet tubes, then I wouldn't be to concerned. I have read of homebrewers cutting the inlet tube a bit shorter to fit more in. I prefer not to fill them that much because you can end up getting the lid partially submerged in the beer and it becomes a PITA to clean and increases risks of infection or mould.
Cheers wiz
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